Why We Drive review – a motorist puts his foot down

Matthew Crawford’s heartfelt riposte to a ‘smart’ future of driverless cars is persuasive and thought-provoking Five years ago I sat around a table of Google executives at the company’s Mountain View headquarters in California. They took turns explaining the virtues of their prototype driverless car, in which I had just meticulously navigated the streets of nearby Palo Alto. The coming revolution in automobiles, they suggested, which the car no doubt represented, would make transit more efficient, smarter, safer and far less prone to human error. Moreover, in transforming drivers into passengers it would free them up to do “more productive”, “less stressful” things (by which the Google VPs no doubt meant: “Give them more time to stare at their phones”). …